What Does Science Say About How To Be A Good Kisser?

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In all fairness, how to be a good kisser is something no one really gets instruction in.
Yet, it can be a huge part of one’s personal life and the sources we do get info from are, well, far from scientific.

Have No Illusions: Kissing Is Important

Research shows kissing frequency correlates with relationship satisfaction.
Overall, the researchers showed that the amount a couple kissed was proportional to their stated level of relationship satisfaction.

59% of men and 66% of women have ended a relationship because someone was a bad kisser.

The first kiss is a necessary risk in every budding sexual relationship; a recent psychology study found that 59 percent of men and 66 percent of women reported breaking things off with a prospective partner because of it. People remember their first kiss more vividly than the first time they had sex.

Psychologist John Bohannon from Butler University has found that most of us can recall up to 90 percent of the details of a first romantic kiss. In his study of five hundred people, most remembered this experience more vividly than their first sexual encounter.

Movies like “Pretty Woman” have said that prostitutes don’t kiss on the mouth because it’s too intimate. Men who kiss their wives before work live 5 years longer, make 20-30% more money and are far less likely to get in a car accident.

Why Do We Kiss?

Kissing is how we test if someone would (biologically) be a good mate.

It matters a lot more to women than men.
Women were very focused on men’s teeth and hygiene.
Men were much more likely to see kissing as a mere step toward sex.
Other studies reveal these differences held true across cultures.

How Do You Find Out If Someone Wants To Kiss You?

This dilemma probably produces more nervousness and awkwardness than anything else related to kissing.
All the sources I checked agreed:
It’s a matter of breaking into your partner’s personal space in a plausibly deniable way and gauging their reaction.

It’s important to note that whether or not your intentions are romantic, to kiss another person on the cheek or elsewhere— or to sniff him or her—it’s necessary to move into that individual’s “personal space.” To get this close, there must be some level of trust or expectation.Thus delivering a friendly kiss or sniff, or receiving one, amounts to an unspoken gesture of acceptance.